Businesses and organizations of all sizes rely on effective administrative organization to function. Organizational management programs are offered at many degree levels, but MBA and other master's level courses in particular provide the academic and experiential foundation of effective business organization.

Because so many facets of business are reliant on effective organization, graduates of organizational and administrative management degree programs have a wide range of careers available to them. Many seek entry level employment as administrative support supervisors and managers. More advanced candidates often seek jobs as administrative services managers and management analysts and consultants.

Those are just a few of the occupations for which organizational managers may be qualified; a combination of strong work experience and appropriate organizational management credentials can qualify candidates for almost any management position.

Organizational and administrative managers of all kinds often supervise support staffs or work cooperatively with other managers, designating tasks and overseeing the daily operations of lower-level employees like sales representatives, customer service representatives, research personnel, and administrative assistants.

The larger a company, the more specialized an organizational manager may be. For example, an office manager at a small company may supervise all employee and support services for that company. An office manager at a larger company may be one of several different managers, each overseeing a distinct aspect of administrative services.

Regardless of specialization, organizational managers ensure that the wheels of a company keep turning, and that they all turn in the right direction, by emphasizing clear lines of communication, authority, and responsibility, and by implementing advanced organizational strategies for more complex industries.

Organizational Management Career Opportunities

Related Careers: Administrative Service Managers, Office and Administrative Support Workers Supervisors and Managers, Project Managers, Management Analysts and Consultants

Businesses in all industries need qualified organizational and administrative managers to maximize efficiency and quality. We've selected a few examples of "good-fit" occupations that organizational management degrees may qualify a candidate, but a combination of strong work experience and appropriate organizational management credentials can qualify candidates for almost any management position.

Office and administrative support supervisors and managers are expected to experience modest growth. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 1.46 million office and administrative support supervisors and managers in 2008. As the economy naturally expands to meet the needs of a growing population, the field is expected to add 160,300 new jobs over 10 years, for a 2018 total of 1.62 million administrative support supervisors and managers. That's an 11% growth rate, about the same as the average for all occupations and slightly higher than the 8.2% predicted expansion of the entire civilian workforce.

Administrative support managers will experience a growth rate slightly faster than the predicted 8.2% expansion of the civilian workforce for 2008 to 2018.Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 259,400 working administrative services managers in 2008. The field is expected to add 32,300 new positions over 10 years, for a 2018 total of 291,700 positions. That's a 12% growth rate, about the same as the average for all occupations and slightly higher than the 8.2% expected expansion of the entire civilian workforce.

Job growth for administrative service managers will be slightly higher than predicted expansion of the civilian workforce over 10 years.Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Organizational management graduates at the master's or doctoral level are often qualified for positions as management analysts, another Bureau of Labor Statistics group that is expected to experience a robust growth rate.

According to the BLS, there were 746,900 management analysts in 2008. Driven by the needs of businesses to remain viable in lean, oversaturated, and competitive markets, the field is expected to add 178,300 new positions over 10 years, for a 2018 total of 925,200 positions. That's a 24% growth rate, much higher than the average for all occupations.

Management Analysts are predicted to experience a robust 24% growth rate, much faster than average for all occupations and the predicted 8.2% expansion of the civilian workforce over the same time period.Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Real job opportunities for qualified candidates in all organizational management fields will be even better than those robust growth rates. The Occupational Information Network combines new jobs and a prediction of the number of existing positions that will be vacated by retirement, career change, early termination, etc.

According to the Occupational Information Network, there will be:

  • 489,000 job openings for administrative support supervisors and managers
  • 86,600 job openings for administrative services managers
  • 306,500 job openings for management analysts

Opportunities will be best across the board for those with advanced degrees and extensive work backgrounds in management and specialist occupations that require a high level or organizational skill.

As businesses downsize staff managers, more organizational management professionals are self-employed, or work for organizational consulting firms.

Organizational Management Earnings

Earnings for organizational management occupations vary by educational achievement and work experience, and employer. Earnings are typically much higher than national median annual wages, however.

According to the BLS, office and administrative support worker supervisors and managers earned a median annual wage of $45,790. The middle 50% of the field earned between $35,360 and $59,280, while the bottom 10% earned less than $27,770 and the top 10% earned more than $74,640.

The BLS reports that administrative services managers earned median annual wages of $73,520 in 2008. The middle 50% of the field earned between $52,240 and $98,980, while the bottom 10% earned less than $37,430 and the top 10% earned more than $129,770.

Finally, management analysts earned an annual median of $73,570 in 2008, according to the BLS. The middle 50% of the field earned between $54,890 and $99,700, while the bottom 10% made less than $41,910 and the top 10% made more than $133,850.

Earnings for organizational management vary by position, but are generally high.Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Organizational Management Educational Benefits

Educational requirements for careers like administrative support managers, administrative service managers, and management analysts vary widely, depending on the industry.

Because business is so results driven, work experience is generally the most important consideration. But as post-secondary education becomes the norm for professional occupations, the competitiveness of the job force increasingly dictates the level of education that a potential employer expects in a given position.

Generally, large and high-profile state-wide and national corporations require more formal credentials, while smaller, local operations may be better able and more willing to consider work experience. Some large, stable mass goods companies like McDonald's, Blockbuster, and Wal-Mart also provide excellent job sales and customer service management opportunities for aspiring operations managers with associate's degree or vocational school credentials.

To qualify for competitive management and administrative services positions in high-profile national and international corporations, many business professionals pursue an MBA or other business master's degree, in organizational management or a related field.

According to the Occupational Information Network, 21% of administrative services managers have no formal education beyond a high school diploma. 39% have some college, including associate's degrees and diplomas in organizational management. The remaining 40% have a bachelor's degree or higher.

More than 3/4 of administrative service managers have some college education.Source: Occupational Information Network

According to the Occupational Information Network, 28% of office and administrative support supervisors and managers have no formal education beyond a high school diploma, 29% have some college, including organizational management associate's degrees and diplomas, and 43% have a bachelor's degree or higher.

Almost 3/4 of administrative support supervisors and managers have some college education.Source: Occupational Information Network

Organizational Management Programs Online

Degrees Possible: Associate's, Bachelor's, Master's and Doctoral Degrees

Organizational management degrees are offered online at all levels. Some organizational management degrees are stand-alone programs; many others are part of an MBA or DBA (Doctor of Business Administration) program.

Whatever program they choose, the best online organizational management programs provide an education as good as one pursued at a local ground school, in a more flexible and remote format that may be better suited to working students. As with all expensive and important educational decisions, do your research when choosing an online organizational management degree program at any level. Is the school accredited? Do credits transfer? What are people saying about this program specifically and this school in general?

Organizational Management Skills and Abilities

Because organizational management is often an element of a rounded business degree, critical skills and abilities vary.

Organizational management programs are designed to teach effective organizational skills, so strong organization is not expected in beginning students. Those that have a strong foundation from which to build, however, will excel.

Organizational management programs are designed for business people who work cooperatively or above many diverse personalities and talents. Strong communication and interpersonal skills are essential to effective management, though like organization, they are not prerequisites.

Organizational management programs generally include a core curriculum of business, mathematics, and social science programs. Individuals with strong experience in the professional workforce in fields like accounting or statistics, and those who are intimately familiar with organizational hierarchies of any kind will likely be quick studies.

Organizational Management Qualifications and Advancement

An organizational management associate's or bachelor's degree (or a degree in a related business field) and strong work experience may qualify candidates for entry level positions as Administrative Support Supervisors and Managers and other first-line supervisor positions in retail and service industries.

Completion of an organizational management master's degree or MBA may qualify working professionals for competitive and high-paying positions as Administrative Service Managers, Management Analysts, or other consulting services.

Additional Information

The Association of Management Consulting Firms maintains a Web site at http://www.amcf.org.

The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences maintains a Web site at http://www.informs.org.